Are Electric Heaters More Cost Effective than HVAC Systems?




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The debate is ongoing when it comes to the question of whether homeowners will save more cash by using portable electric heaters as opposed to a central heating system. For better or worse, a variety of streamate circumstances factor into whether using electric “space” heaters is more cost effective than running an HVAC system. With energy and fuel costs on a steady incline, Jasminlive homeowners are constantly seeking ways to keep their utility bills manageable without sacrificing comfort. Therefore, many have turned to electric space heaters to supplement their existing systems or to use as a primary home heating method. Some of the Pros and Cons In weighing the cost effectiveness of using livejasmin space heaters, and comparing their use to a continuously-running central heating system, several of the aforementioned factors include: The size of the rooms or living spaces to keep warm. The amount of time during the day that the electric heater will be operating. The cost of electricity versus the cost of other fuels in a particular jasmin live area. In the U.S., fuel and electricity rates vary according to region. An electric heater is “technically” 100 percent efficient, in that it directly converts all electricity it uses into heat. This does not mean there is no waste involved in using these apparatuses or that solely relying on them to heat a Jasminelive.biz home won’t use up a significant amount of electricity. Therefore, as many have found, portable electric heaters must be used judiciously. They are often most effective when used in conjunction with home heating systems. For instance, homeowners who desire to use space heaters to cut costs should consider turning their thermostats down during the day and locating these devices only in spaces that are occupied, moving them from room to room if necessary. For safety and energy-saving purposes, set the thermostat at a comfortable level at night, and turn space heaters off. Homeowners should examine and compare their monthly energy bills to determine the efficiency of a heating strategy such as this, and adjust accordingly. Through trial and error, homeowners should eventually discover what works best for their particular situation.

Will a Fireplace Lower My Heating Bill?

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‘Tis the season for chestnuts roasting on an open fire, right? A fireplace not only creates a cozy room, but it also gives off heat, so will it save you money on your heating bill this winter? Chances are, no. While a blazing fire in its place does give off some heat, a majority of the heat it produces gets sent right up the chimney. If you notice lighting a fire warms at least the room its in, you could turn off your furnace will enjoying the fire. However, keep in mind that the rest of your home will probably be cool, and might put your furnace into overdrive when you turn it back on, which isn’t efficient. If you’re dead set on having a fire though, the cost of wood might be something to take into consideration, unless you’ve got a free source of it. If you’re looking for ways to lower your heating bill this winter, there are a few things you can try besides lighting a fire. Start by lowering your thermostat. You don’t have to freeze yourself out, just lower it a few degrees and throw on a sweater. When you’re not at home or when you’re sleeping, lower it by ten degrees. Kitchen and bathroom fans are giant heat suckers, so once the smoke and mirrors are clear, turn them off. When you aren’t using the fireplace, close the damper, otherwise you’re basically dealing with a hole in the roof, and since heat rises, there goes the heating bill. Make sure all of the heating vents in your home are clear, as they sometimes get covered by rugs or furniture. Take advantage of sunlight during the day and open the curtains to heat your home. Before you light the fire this winter, consider th

Where Does the Energy Go?

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If you’re thinking of ways to lower your monthly energy bill, you might be wondering what appliances or actions are costing you the most energy, or in turn, the most money. Below is a breakdown of where the energy in your home is being used. Heating and cooling: 50% Approximately half of your energy costs are going toward heating and cooling the rooms of your home. So, if you are looking for places to cut costs, this would be the best place to start. Of course, reducing the heat in the winter and the air conditioning in the summer will save a lot of energy and money. You should also look into applying more insulation to your home (floors, walls, garages, basement, attic) to create better efficiency. If you live in an older home, make sure your windows and doors have a tight seal around them to prevent drafts. Appliances: 23% While the fridge, dishwasher, and laundry appliances used to be the main energy suckers, electronics have upped this category in the last few years. Reduce this number by unplugging your electronics when they aren’t in use. Televisions and phone chargers still use energy when they are plugged into the wall. Heating water: 15% While heating the water in your home doesn’t makeup very much of your bill, you can reduce this number by taking shorter hot showers, washing your clothes in cold water instead of hot, wrapping your hot water heater with an insulation blanket, or lowering the temperature on the water heater to 120 degrees. Lighting: 12% Lighting makes up the smallest portion of your energy bill, but the old rule still stands: turn out the lights when you’re not using them. Take advantage of natural daylight, and if you choose, purchase fluorescent light bulbs for lamps and light fixtures.

Energy Saving Tools

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Everyone is making an effort to save a little energy and money these days. As a result, many manufacturers have tapped into the market and make products specifically to help accomplish these goals. Several companies make energy saving sockets that plug into the electrical outlets in your home. These sockets save money by turning off the electricity to the device that’s plugged into them when not in use. Take a cell phone charger. This electronic device will still use electricity even when you are not charging a phone. If you are using an energy saving socket, you can set a time limit for the phone to charge. After the time has elapsed, the socket will shut off the electricity to the charger, saving you some cash. A device such as this might also provide you with some peace of mind; you wouldn’t have to wonder if you left the coffee pot on or kept the curling iron plugged in. A similar product is a power strip that conserves energy with a wireless remote. For example, you could plug in all of the devices used in your entertainment system — TV, DVD player, game console, etc — into the conserve power strip. When you’re done using these devices, instead of unplugging them, just use the remote control to turn off the power strip. Another product worth considering is a clip, or a cord holder. Something like this sticks to the wall or your desk near an outlet. When you want to unplug a device, it holds the cord for you so you don’t have to go searching for it next time. These are just some of the many products companies are producing that are making it easier for consumers to save money and energy use.

Should I Insulate My Garage?

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You probably think of your garage as a place to park your car or store your tools. However, if it's attached to your house, it could be sucking the energy out of your electricity when your home is being heated or cooled. Even if the wall shared by the garage and your house is insulated, an uninsulated garage is still cold in the winter and hot in the summer. That temperature will lower, or raise) the temperature of your home, causing your furnace or air conditioner to work harder than if it were insulated. The warm or cool air in your home will escape from your garage, without you realizing it. The cost of insulating your garage depends on how how big it is and the type of insulation you're going to use. Insulating and entire garage, including three walls and the ceiling, with fiberglass bat insulation would cost around $275 for a garage measuring just under 600 square feet. Of course, you'll get the money back over time as you save electricity on the main part of your home. Adding insulation to your garage will also increase the resale value of your home should you ever try to sell it. If you really want to go all out with this project, consider insulating your garage door as well. If you do it yourself, start the same way you would with the other walls, by selecting the type of insulation you want to use. Then, measure the different panels on the door and cut the insulation to fit them. This way, your door will still be operational without any problems. Finally, attach the insulation panels to the door using heavy duty double-sided tape, or even glue. Insulation in your garage, even if it's unheated or without air conditioning, will keep the garage 20-40 degrees different than outside, while saving electricity and money on the main part of your home.

Home Heating: Inefficient Windows Contribute to High Heating Costs




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Heating a home during the winter can be quite an expensive proposition if homeowners don’t take measures to conserve energy and limit waste. Leaky, drafty windows will allow warm air to seep out of the home while cold air permeates into the dwelling. This will cause a home heating system to work harder and expend more energy. The good news is that we’ve become much wiser about energy conservation in recent years. With the help of new technologies, along with a number of common-sense techniques, many window-related energy loss issues can be addressed. A Window into Energy Savings Following are some steps that homeowners can take to increase the efficiency of their windows and to reduce energy usage while maintaining a desired level of wintertime comfort: Have ENERGY STAR-qualified windows installed in your home. Double-paned low emissivity (Low-E) windows and windows with a low “U-Factor” provide excellent insulation and offer more resistance to heat loss. This will lighten the load on your HVAC system and in many cases reduce energy costs by 15 to 30 percent. Adjust the shades and curtains over windows according to the position of the sun. Cover up windows during the evening and those that are not exposed to direct sunlight during the day in order to contain heat. Keep window coverings open where warming sunlight streams into a room. Seal around older windows with caulk or weather stripping. Also, apply an energy-efficient coating to these windows or purchase an insulator kit and cover them with plastic film. Draft stoppers or “draft snakes” can also be placed around the bottoms of windows and doors in order to limit air seepage. “Batten down the hatches” this winter and attend to those windows! By doing so, you’ll diminish the strain on your furnace and your finances.